Learning to Embrace the Generational Friction Factor

Dad and Gardening

Last spring I decided to plant a garden.  Having grown up in the Northeast region of the US, with a father who is a Pennsylvania Dutch farmer, I was accustom to homegrown delicacies year round!  I now live in the Northwest region, where rain is abundant and sunshine scarce…farming would be challenging.  Before starting, I researched the planting zones and visited a local nursery to chat with the experts.   After purchasing the seeds most likely to thrive and the proper fertilizer and soil, I was ready to begin. Each morning started with an evaluation for the need for watering, weeding and feeding to customize a plan accordingly.  Within a month my efforts were rewarded with a beautiful garden.

The lessons learned were simple, but essential for success. Gardens need customized care based on the exposure to elements:  weather, sun and soil.  If any of the essentials were missing, the garden would not thrive.

 

The same principles can be applied to our current work force environments.  In order for our teams to thrive, we must customize our generational language to create a harmonious team that is empowered to succeed.

A Generational Snapshot

Looking at generational snapshot in the USA, each have personalities influenced by multiple historic events.

  • Traditionalists, born from 1927-1945: Great Depression, WWII
  • Baby Boomers, 1946-1964: Moon Walk, JFK / MLK Assassination, Vietnam War
  • Generation X, 1965-1977: Watergate, Oil Crisis, AIDS, Dot-Com, Gulf War
  • Generation Y, 1978-1999: Columbine, OK City Bomb, 911, Katrina

Generations are Colliding

For the first time in history, we currently have four generations in the work force and the Friction Factor is real. Companies, large and small, are experiencing dissatisfied employees and high turnover rates. A recent study by Accenture reports the top four reasons people leave a job are:  lack of recognition/appreciation, internal politics, lack of empowerment and they don’t like their boss.  The majority of reasons why employees quit are under the control of the employer.  From a generational perspective, we can customize our language and interaction with each group to support their needs and create a meaningful environment for all. The right question to consider is, “How do we best appeal to each generation and appreciate them in their preferred language”?   First we need know the various generations of the company.  The Traditionalists and the Baby Boomers include our more senior employees.  Generation X and Y compile the middle age and younger team members.  Each category has a unique potential to contribute to company growth IF we speak in the generational language that best appeals to them.

Let’s say you are a Baby Boomer Director of Sales, about to provide feedback to a Generation Y Professional Sales Representative.  Your interaction with him / her from a verbal, non-verbal and technological standpoint will influence their motivation and productivity.

 Take the Generational Challenge

Below are six examples of how a company can more effectively communicate with varying generations.

  1. Dress to the oldest generation. Gen Y, if you have a meeting with a Baby Boomer:
    • Men, wear a button down collared shirt, tie and jacket
    • Women, a conservative dress or dress shirt with a skirt or pants
  2. Generation X prefer to maximize efficiency. Email and text is the preferred form communication.
  3. The older the generation, the more they equate title with respect. Call each person by an appropriate title, “Mrs. Hall”, “Dr. Jones”.
  4. When providing support information about your product, determine which type of resource speaks the right language. Tangible paper resources vs. technology.  Traditionalists and Boomers are not as familiar / comfortable with technology as compared to the younger generations. Choose accordingly.
  5. Gen Y are connected 24/7. Technology and flexibility are company cultures they seek.
  6. Senior teammates build relationships first…business second. Follow up with a personal phone call vs. an email or text.

I invite you to select three challenges from above to customize your generational language to increase employee career satisfaction and company growth. To learn more about how you can apply effective generational tactics in your life connect with LisaCopelandCommunications.com.

 

Copyright 2016 Lisa Copeland.  All rights reserved.

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